Closed Monday Oct. 10: On Monday, October 10 the library will closed all day for staff development.

Closed Monday Oct. 10

Code Talkers

by Laura Reilly on Aug 10, 2022

August 14th is National Navajo Code Talkers Day, a day to celebrate the contributions made by Native Americans during World War ll. The day was officially recognized in 1982 by President Ronald Reagan and in 2001 President George Bush presented each of the original 29 Navajo marines with a Congressional Gold Medal. The Navajo Code Talkers played a critical role in the war effort by using their complex language for coding and transmitting messages in a time when secrecy was crucial. This code was so complex that it was never broken by the Japanese military. The Navajo Code Talkers transmitted over 800 messages successfully and were instrumental in the success of World War ll. To learn more about these amazing Code Talkers and other spy related novels try:

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Read Your Way Through the Classics in Graphic Style

by Laura Reilly on May 28, 2022

Ever want to revisit the classics or read a classic that you never got around to but just don’t have the time? Ever think I wouldn’t mind reading Beowulf but I don’t have the patience for the old English version? Then reading the classics in graphic form might be a good fit for you. Graphic novels are all the rage right now with publishers re-releasing classics in graphic format for middle grade, young adult and adult readers. Everything from the Odyssey to The Handmaid’s Tale is being converted to this new style of literature.

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Pick your doorway

by Laura Reilly on Apr 9, 2022

Librarians are often asked, “Can you recommend a book for me?” With so many books to choose from the list can get pretty long before finding a good fit for a patron. Therefore, librarians often rely on the Four Doorways method created by librarian Nancy Pearl. The four doorways represent different aspects of a fiction or narrative non-fiction book that appeal to the reader. These doorways are Character, Story, Setting, and Language. When you analyze what aspect you liked most about the last story you read, it becomes easier to find your next book to enjoy.

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Black History Month

by Laura Reilly on Feb 4, 2022

February is Black History Month, a time to celebrate the achievements of those in the African-American community, and recognize their many contributions to our society. Black History Month was founded in 1926 by historian Carter G. Woodson as a way to educate the public on the significant role African-Americans have played in our country’s history. The month of February was chosen by Woodson because it is the birth month of President Abraham Lincoln and Frederick Douglass, both of whom fought for civil rights. Black History Month was made a month of national observance in 1976 by President Gerald Ford, and every year there is a theme for Black History Month; this year’s theme is “Black Health and Wellness”.

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Windows, Mirrors, and Sliding Glass Doors

by Laura Reilly on Dec 14, 2021

What do windows, mirrors, and sliding glass door have to do with reading? This phrase was first coined in 1990 by Dr. Rudine Sims Bishop to explain how children learn about themselves and those around them through literature. Books that act as windows give children (and adults) a view into a world that is different from their own. Here the reader can learn about different cultures and experiences outside of their normal everyday life. Books that act as sliding glass doors work similar to windows but allow the reader to be fully immersed in a book, using their imagination to travel back and forth between the two worlds. Books that act as mirrors are reflections of the reader. When readers see themselves in books, they feel valued and understood.

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Foodie Book Club

by Laura Reilly on Oct 14, 2021

Getting tired of your same old book club? Why not try spicing it up (literally!) with some food? For a creative twist at your next book club meeting try adding some of the food and drinks that come from the setting of your novel.

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Books As Therapy

by Laura Reilly on Aug 12, 2021

Can fiction books really help you feel better? Using books as therapy has actually been around since the ancient Greeks, it was used after World War l and World War ll to help returning soldiers deal with post-traumatic stress disorder, and is currently used in educational settings as therapy for school-aged children. While non-fiction, self-help books are commonly sought after by individuals looking for help dealing with a specific issue, fiction books are quickly becoming a source of therapy for these same concerns.

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Staycation Summer Reads

by Laura Reilly on Jun 14, 2021

Not quite ready to travel by plane, train or automobile? Let books transport you to distant lands and powdery, sandy beaches while you stay snug and safe at home. There are some great new fiction and non-fiction books that will make you feel like you’ve vacationed in Australia or Greece or walked on the sandy beaches of Hawaii without ever leaving your home.

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Cozy Mysteries

by Laura Reilly on May 6, 2021

Love mysteries and thrillers but don’t like all the violence and scary plotlines they usually have? Then Cozy Mysteries may be for you! Cozy Mysteries are a subgenre of mystery novels and are a gentler version of graphic crime dramas. Usually the violence is minimal, the detectives are amateurs and the setting takes place in a small, cozy community. These novels involve a puzzle to be solved with clues interspersed throughout the storyline and have a clear conclusion at the end as to whodunit and why. The main protagonist in the story is rarely a professional and is more than likely to be a community member that stumbles upon a clue and feels compelled to investigate the situation. Most protagonists are women like the famous Miss Marple but they can also have animals as main characters as in Purr M for Murder, the first book in the Cat Rescue Mystery series by T.C. LoTempio, in which Toby the cat helps his owner solve a mystery.

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March Mystery Madness

by Laura Reilly on Mar 15, 2021

You may have heard of March Madness for basketball but have you heard of March Mystery Madness at the library? March is a great time of the year to enjoy a good mystery and libraries across the country use this month to focus on the Mystery genre. Mysteries are a form of literature that typically involve a crime or circumstance that needs to be solved. Mysteries can include the supernatural and usually have a suspect that the story revolves around.

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Classic novels-time for a revisit?

by Laura Reilly on Dec 11, 2020

This time of year always has me thinking about snowfalls, crackling fires, decorated trees, and a cozy blanket to curl up in and read a good book. If the hectic holiday season is wearing you out, a classic novel might be just what you need to slow down and relax. Classic literature is often referred to as “Great Books” but why is that? The reason stems from a type of literature that stands the test of time due to classic themes, quality writing and deemed to have great scholarly value. Even though many of these novels were written well over 100 years ago they still have relevance for our modern society. These classics are found by academics to improve language and writing skills as well as critical thinking. Even though some views expressed in the classics may be quite dated or even shocking, it’s also a testament to how society has progressed over the years.

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Historical Fiction-Adventures from the Past

by Laura Reilly on Aug 13, 2020

I have always loved history! I enjoy learning about events of the past and historical fiction transports the reader back in time giving one a front row seat to the past. Authors spend countless hours researching documents, written text and sources from the time to paint as complete a picture as possible of the events of the day. The authors give voice to the characters of the past as they bring history to life in a way that non-fiction is unable to do. By giving dialogue to the characters of the past, the reader feels like they are witnessing the private life of Abe Lincoln as he struggles to govern a nation torn by Civil War, or the Lindberghs as they grapple with the kidnapping of their only child, or what life was like in a concentration camp in The Tattooist of Auschwitz

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